Hogan For Senate

by Dylan Sondike ‘24 With Governor Hogan of Maryland’s two term limit up next year, there has been much speculation if he could attempt to oppose Senator Chris Van Hollen in the 2022 midterm election. In his 7 years as Governor of Maryland, he has done one of the best jobs, not only compared to former Governors of Maryland, but … Read More

Remind Is Superior to e-mail

by Tori Martinez ‘23 In the online learning environment e-mails play a large role in student-teacher communication, however, e-mails can sometimes be hard to navigate. The Remind app offers a time-efficient and convenient way for students and teachers to communicate concisely, and therefore is preferable to e-mail.  When teachers have more than one e-mail address, it can be confusing and … Read More

Let’s Do More Than Repost

by Aidan Trump ‘21 It seems that each time I open Instagram I’m presented with a seemingly infinite number of my peer’s Instagram stories presenting the same visually appealing pictures memorializing the victims of sexual assault, police brutality, gun violence, and hate crimes. I’d be lying if I were to say that I’d never reposted these types of posts. It’s … Read More

LEOBR Was Rightfully Repealed

by Nicholas Schade ‘23 On Saturday, Maryland lawmakers passed the Maryland Police Accountability Act of 2021, a package of five bills aimed at reforming the state’s police. One of such bills repealed Maryland’s Law Enforcement Bill of Rights (LEOBR), a law that puts misconduct investigations mostly in the hands of the police and grants the officers being investigated various protections. … Read More

The Unbalanced Work-Life Balance

by Jay Joseph ‘22 The digital age brought the workplace home, first through phone calls, then through emails, and finally through instant messaging. Workers and students alike found themselves increasing the time spent at work to gain accomplishments they could pride themselves in. As the workplace moved online during the pandemic, the boundaries between work and life became even more … Read More

Benefits of Virtual AP Exams

by Reade Fenner ‘22 MCPS announced on March 25 that all AP final exams for this school year will be virtual. There are certain exceptions, however, for world language and music theory courses that must be administered in person, as well as for other certain classes, such as AP Calculus, that are ideally completed on paper. Although the idea of … Read More

Rangers Opener Surrounded with Politics

by Colin Horan ‘21 On April 5, the Texas Rangers met the Toronto Blue Jays in an opening day matchup that boasted 40,000 fans, making the game the first full-capacity professional sporting event in over a year. Along with the game came a healthy dose of politics and controversy. Texas Governor Greg Abbott refused to throw out the game’s ceremonial … Read More

How To Stop Mass Shootings

by Jimmy Yates ‘21 Mass Shootings are something Americans have become all too familiar with and the cause is quite clear. The United States is home to 4.4 percent of the world’s population, but Americans own 42 percent of the world’s guns. From 1996 to 2012, the U.S. was responsible for 31 percent of global mass shootings. In 2017, a … Read More

Start Listening

by Anna Haas ‘23 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will be releasing its once-a-decade report on the normal climate temperature on May 4th. It will be announced that there is going to be a new, even higher baseline temperature. From 1981-2010, the baseline temperature was 52.8 degrees Fahrenheit. From 1991-2020 the baseline temperature bumped up to 53.3 degrees Fahrenheit. … Read More

Reopen Schools Next Fall

by Tori Newby ‘22 Beginning in March 2020, MCPS shifted to a virtual learning style to accommodate the health and safety of the community amidst the coronavirus pandemic. Since then, schools have remained online, with a select number of students choosing to return to the buildings last month and even more students planning to return later this spring. Many students … Read More