AP Classes Come with a Catch

by Olivia Snyder ‘12 Since when are juniors “free” the moment May hits? How is it that classes are considered “pointless” and therefore deemed “skippable” in those last weeks of school? And why is it that juniors develop “senioritis” when there’s still a good month of junior year left to complete?  My guess is AP classes. The curriculum for most … Read More

Give Us News We Can Use

by Jacob Bogage ‘12 “There was a time,” the movie “Anchorman” begins, “when the local anchorman reigned supreme.” The same adage rings true at Sherwood. Every morning from 9:04 to 9:09 the morning announcements are piped via public address system and Sherwood TV channel 37 to each and every classroom. Announcements are inescapable and sometimes irritating. They spread news that … Read More

High School Elections: A Petty Democracy

by Robel Wondimu ‘13 In the final week of May a spurious event takes place in Sherwood, SGA elections, our school’s emulation of democracy. I ran for Junior Class President and what I found out is disheartening. In Sherwood the problem with elections lies in the underlying procedural structure. Candidates running for office are limited to four posters and are … Read More

Can’t Trump Competition With Fame

by Allie Sivak ’11 It was enough of a shock when Arnold Schwarzenegger put down his machine guns, slapped on a suit and became the Republican “Govenator” of California in October of 2003. However, more and more frequently, some of the nation’s top political positions are being filled, or at least pursued, by shoes that have walked the red carpet. … Read More

Strive for Self Interest, Not College

by Leah Schroeder ‘13 For years, students in Montgomery County have been force-fed, and have willingly swallowed, the idea that to get into college, their best bet is to load up on AP classes, honor societies and clubs. In a recent column from The Washington Post, noted columnist George Will quoted from Andrew Ferguson’s new book, “Crazy U: One Dad’s … Read More

We Could Learn a Thing from the Japanese

by Rebecca Stussman ’12 The response of the Japanese public to the earthquake and tsunami that devastated its northeast coast on March 11 has been nothing short of admirable. Amidst over 20,000 deaths and miles of flattened property, amidst an almost complete destruction of Japanese daily life, citizens remain boldfaced, optimistic and, most remarkably, organized. There is no widespread looting, … Read More

Good Grades Don’t Need Extra Pay-Off

by Michael Natelli ’14 Two weeks ago, Honor Roll students were rewarded for their strong academic performance. They had the opportunity to watch seven songs from the Rock N’ Roll Revival performance during 2nd period and part of 3rd period. This is a rather generous and unnecessary award for doing the work students are supposed to.  Does the Sherwood administration … Read More

The History Channel Falls to Reality

by Max Simpson ‘11   Programming on the History Channel has taken a noticeable turn over the past few years. The recent premiere of “Only in America With Larry the Cable Guy” (although it is hilarious) did not seem to fit in with the programs you would expect on a channel previously dedicated to documentaries. Other recent shows such as … Read More

Tech Credit Needs Reform

by Rebecca Stussman ‘12   This past Monday, I met with my counselor, as the administration advised all juniors to do, and was informed that I am in danger of not graduating. My grades are fine, my service hours complete, my HSAs passed, so what was the problem? After taking some of the most rigorous math, science and literature courses … Read More

Libraries Provide More than Nostalgia

by Leah Schroeder ‘13   Libraries used to be community gathering places where people could conduct research for various projects and find books to read over the weekend. All the same, library use has been exponentially declining. On January 1, the Olney Library closed its doors for renovations and won’t reopen until fall 2012. In the past, this move would … Read More